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Tag Archives: video

TGIF – And We’re Back

pretty much #savemindyproject

Well, after a long hiatus, TGIF is back!

There were a few reasons for the hiatus, and some big news is on the horizon for TTRO. I won’t say too much yet (stay tuned for another post), but changes are coming. Over the past year or so my life has changed quite a bit. I’m spending more and more time building a biz as a freelance writer, social media consultant and now speaker(!), which means TTRO is due for a major overhaul so that it represents my life in its new, slightly more grown up form.

You’ll notice over the coming months that I will be posting somewhat different content from what you’ve come to expect at times, but don’t worry – the music itself will never completely go away. It remains a vital part of my daily existance.

On that note, Canadian Music Week is in full swing in Toronto, and I wrote about Some Shows I Think You Should See at CMW for Notable, if you’re curious about my picks. Get out there and see some live music!

Now, for the link love:

Lisa

Ben E. King – Stand By Me

song of the week!

I have a feeling that everyone on the planet has heard this song at least once in their life, which is enough times to feel affected by it.

As a 13-year-old I was obsessed with the movie Stand By Me (and River Phoenix), so this song has a special place in my heart.

Ben passed away on Thursday, but this song will literally live on forever. RIP Ben, thanks for making us feel all the feelings and reminding us to hold our friends a little closer.

 Lisa

Ed The Sock Explains What Happened To Good Canadian Television

Ed The Sock CRTC

Remember the days of Kids In The Hall? The days when MuchMusic was your favourite thing on TV because they actually played music? And for my parents generation, maybe you even remember SCTV and the original Degrassi?

There was a time when Canadian TV was all about innovation, despite the tiny budget. No – because of the tiny budget. But that tiny budget also meant we could never compete with American broadcasters in primetime.

If you’ve been following the CRTC rulings lately, you’ll know some great things have been put into action – for example, them forcing the big name providers to offer a basic TV package for $25, and then allowing you to pick and choose the extra channels you want.

As a self professed TV nerd, I am all for this. Rogers and Bell have been ripping off cable users for a damn long time, and this kind of ruling was absolutely necessary.

But the ruling Ed the Sock is talking about is different. CRTC also passed a rule to loosen the daytime CanCon requirements for TV producers, and there will no longer be genre protection for specialty channels – meaning MuchMusic doesn’t have to play any music (though that stopped happening ages ago), and History Channel doesn’t have to show any history – as Ed puts it.

For the most part, I agree with what Ed is saying – equating money with innovation is always wrong. That’s exactly why I think the best art is always the first thing the artist releases, when they are poor and struggling and full of innovation and passion and desire. The first album, the first novel, the first film or TV show, that’s the stuff that sticks in the cannon throughout an artists life for a reason.

Having no budget means you have no choice but to be your most creative self.

On the other hand, I don’t think it’s wrong for the CRTC to want Canadian productions to be able to increase production values so that our industry can at least try to compete with what the American networks produce.

There’s a reason we watch more American television than Canadian, and it’s not because we don’t have the talent and skill to make shows as great as our Southern friends – it’s because the budgets up here are nothing compared to what they are down there.

Tons of American shows are shot and produced up here (Hannibal being my absolute favourite) – the difference between that show and the Canadian made shows we ignore on CBC is the budget – which trickles into the actors they can hire, the ability to have one consistent showrunner onboard from the pilot to the finale, the directors they can afford, the writers, the production design, the shooting locations, and so on and so on.

Maybe Canadians like keeping our TV in a specialized “Canadiana” stereotype world of Trailer Park Boys and Corner Gas, but if that were true, Canadians wouldn’t spend the majority of their TV time watching American and British produced shows.

That said, more money does not equal more innovation, but it does allow the innovators to translate the vision they have in their head into the one we see on the screen – rather than shooting a version they end up ashamed of because the budget didn’t leave any room for that vision to be realistically created.

Hear his thoughts below, and let me know what you think about the new changes.

Lisa

Why You Should Be Excited for Intel’s RealSense Technology

realsense tech

The future is here yet again, thanks to Intel.

We all know technology is at a groundbreaking point. We’ve come so far so fast, but while advancements have happened at a steady incline over the past decade, the number of ways we use technology in our life is about to skyrocket like never before.

We’ve seen this in wearable tech and robot bartenders, but the most important way it affects our lives is in how it helps us work and create.

If you’re a creative professional (which I know most of you are), Intel’s RealSense technology is going to blow your mind.

Take a look at the RealSense website to flip through all the advancements that are coming because of it.

I’m particularly excited about the 3D camera capability. I had the chance to work with some 3D makers this summer, and it was so enjoyable that I’m in the middle of learning how to create my own 3D designs for printing (more on that in the coming weeks). This kind of camera will simplify the 3D scanning process and make it affordable for the rest of us.

It also has the ability to take a photo of something and have it instantly measured (as seen above). Measuring tape is about to become a thing of the past, and that is going to be a true blessing for anyone in construction and interior design.

It also features gesture control – which means that you can literally doodle in the air and your art will appear on the screen. I have no idea how this is even possible but I can’t wait to use it!

We’ve been watching the Jim Parsons commercials for this with curiosity over the past few months, but the time has finally come to see what it’s all about.

I’m testing the super thin new Dell Venue 8 Series tablet next week (which has RealSense built in), and will let you know how much I love it after I’ve had some time to explore the features.

I’m required to disclose the relationship between my site and Intel Canada, but all opinions are my own!

Lisa

Lesley Gore – You Don’t Own Me

song of the week!

Today is International Women’s Day, which means it’s the perfect day to celebrate how far we’ve come – but also to recognize how far we still have to go.

My brilliant friend Maddy of Meat Locker Editions (an awesome female founded publishing company) wrote this little rant about #IWD, and it perfectly sums up my feelings about today:

International Women’s Day: a rambling of thoughts. Affirming my commitment to learn more and fight harder – in small and bigger ways – for the rights and freedoms of all women; challenging myself to make sure I practice inclusivity; recognizing my privilege and the benefits it affords me, reviewing how I can work from this position to be a better woman, ally, person. Last night I had a sobering reminder of how far we still have to fight, of the violence, manipulation and abuse that women face daily here in our city, country, world. Thinking of the despicable treatment of our Indigenous women, thinking of how we must make change. Pushing myself to learn and from a place of humility, do what I can. Refusing to be bullied any longer. Celebrating the women who fought before me, the women who raised me, the strength and guidance we find as we continue to grow our understanding of womanhood.

The one leg of equality women in North America still majorly struggle with is that of equal pay and equal respect in the workplace. It is a cause very dear to my heart. If you’re struggling with a horrible work situation, remember Tina Fey’s brilliant advice:

So my unsolicited advice to women in the workplace is this. When faced with sexism or ageism or lookism or even really aggressive Buddhism, ask yourself the following question: “Is this person in between me and what I want to do?” If the answer is no, ignore it and move on. Your energy is better used doing your work, and outpacing people that way. Then, when you’re in charge, don’t hire the people who were jerky to you.

That brings me to this weeks song. Leslie Gore passed away recently, and her music most definitely helped usher in that first wave of feminism we owe so much of our current freedom to.

This is a feminist anthem that will never go out of style. Even those girls who somehow think being a ‘feminist’ today is a bad thing, can get behind the sentiment she’s singing about.

Lisa