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Tag Archives: Music

Where to Celebrate Record Store Day in Toronto

rsdsonicboom

Hey guys! I decided that, since tomorrow is vinyl nerd Christmas, it makes more sense to give you the rundown of how Toronto is celebrathing this beloved annual holiday today in leiu of TGIF this week – so you can prepaire accordingly.

I am currently on my way back home to Welland to celebrate Easter with my fam – why oh why did this day land on the Easter weekend? Come on, guys… what am I gonna do in Welland to get my fix? No Record Store Day limited editions for me this year. So please, please, enjoy it for me.

Here’s a breakdown of what’s happening where and when, starting with stores that aren’t going as RSD crazy and ending with the best spot to hit up – so you don’t miss a thing tomorrow. Thanks to my amazing intern Sebastien for putting the list together! Let us know in the comments if there’s a store we missed that you think deserves a shout out.

Neurotica Records

  • 642 Queen Street W
  • 12 pm – 9 pm
  • Neurotica’s website has a ticker of featured and rare vinyls that they have in stock to help the hunting process. Refresh the page a few times to and see if anything there might interest you.

She Said Boom

  • She Said Boom has two locations, one at 393 Roncesvalles Avenue, and one at 372 College Street
  • They’re open from 11 am – 7 pm at both locations
  • They recently promised a forthcoming list of releases on their Twitter (though time is running short), so keep an eye out there for what you might want to buy!

Kops Records

  • Kops Records also has two locations, the most well known one being at 229 Queen Street W, and the other at 592 Bloor Street W
  • Open from 11 am – 8 pm at both stores
  • Kops records has not been forthcoming with details of what will be in stock. I guess that means you’re just going to have to head there to hunt things down. But it’s Kops, so you’d be crazy not to anyways.

Rotate This

  • 801 Queen Street W
  • 11:02 am – 7 pm
  • Unless your ear is much lower to the ground than mine, this is another record store that it seems you’re just going to have to go to to find out what they’ll have in stock. Again though, it’d be hard to believe you weren’t intending on heading down there in the first place.

Play de Record

  • 357a Yonge Street
  • Open 12 pm – 8pm
  • Play de Record has gained a reputation for it’s Unique selection of hip hop and electronic music. With DJ’s spinning music in honour of Record Store day, Play de Record is a necessary stop in your travels and hosts a substantial selection of turntables and DJ equipment, for the gearheads that intend to be out browsing this weekend.

Sunrise Records

  • 784 Yonge Street
  • 8:30 am – 9pm
  • Not only do Sunrise card holders get in early, but if you buy or renew your ID Card that day, you will get a vinyl sticker added to your card. That’s good for your ID Card discount + an extra 10% Off all non-RSD vinyl for the next year.
  • Sunrise has been showing off their warehouse stock, which includes Childish Gambino’s Because the internet , Chvrches Recover EP and many others on their facebook page. Give it a gander, and see what tickles your fancy.

June Records

  • 662 College Street
  • 11 am – 9 pm
  • June Records will have DJs spinning music all day to accompany your browsing experience
  • So far they’ve released exactly two albums that they’ll have in stock. Frank Zappa’s Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow and Alexander Robotnick’s Vintage Robotnicks. Head down there to see what else they’ll have.

Cabin Fever Collective

  • 1669 Bloor Street W
  • 8am – 8 pm
  • Cabin Fever is pulling out all the stops, and was a serious contender for the number one spot. Not only are they giving out free coffee all day, they have a liquor license in the evening to accompany a live show that includes a performance by Papermaps.
  • They’ve been hosting a few contests on their twitter page, with one of the prizes being a chance to be first in the store. They’ve made an effort to bring in as many record store day releases as possible, so this prize may be a boon to those of you with an eye out for that super rare release!

Sonic Boom

  • Sonic Boom has two locations, one in the Annex at 782 Bathurst Street, and one in Kensington at 201 Augusta Ave
  • The Annex location will be open 10 am – midnight, while the Kensington location will be open from 11 am – 9 pm
  • The Annex location, however, is the place to be this year for Record store day. With an event hosted by Chart Attack and Fuelled by Pistonhead Lager, pay a visit to Sonic Boom and be sure to catch any of the free live performances taking place throughout the afternoon. A full lineup can be found on their Facebook page.

Lisa

Here’s Every States Favourite Band (Infographic)

every state's favourite band

The website Music Machinery performed this study on how location can affect music taste. The map above shows the interesting results (click to make it larger).

Someone should do this for Canada. Our provinces are so huge it’s hard to imagine any one artist that could define the taste of the entire population, except for maybe Alberta in the same way that it was no surprise George Strait took Texas (though I was rooting for Willie Nelson) and Bruce took New Jersey.

 Lisa

Don’t Touch My Records (Or, Music and Memories)

Diner

I’ve watched Diner at least a few times in my life, and to this day I can still say without hesitation that it’s easily one of the best films the 80s ever produced. The “don’t touch my records” scene gets me every time. The first time I saw Diner I was still in high school and my only access to vinyl was my dads small collection in the basement that he no longer used because his decades old record player needed repair and he had more important financial obligations, so it all went to waste. It wasn’t until I moved to Toronto for university that I started my own collection, taking what my dad would give me from his and searching through flea markets for old Beatles, Doors and Led Zeppelin records.

My collection now certainly isn’t massive, and I’m nowhere near as anal as Shrevie with my organization (old ie. pre 1980s records alphabetized together, new ie. post 1980s records alphabetized together), but I relate completely to him in this scene, as do music geeks around the word. It expresses perfectly that obsessive love people like us have for this all important art form. When she says “It’s just music, not that big a deal” my heart aches for him. Imagine dating someone and hearing them say this? Ultimate deal breaker.

Music has always acted as a marker for moments in my life, and just as he remembers what song was playing when he first met her, I remember songs in relation to people and moments, almost exclusively. Who introduced me to this artist? Where did I first hear that song? It all takes on a heavy meaning that stays filed somewhere in the back of my brain, and comes flooding back the second I think of a particular song.

I will never forget the song “One Day At A Time” because I associate it with my Grandma’s funeral, where it was played and I learned the French version was her favorite song. I had no idea she liked music, and even if it was an overtly religious song that would normally make me cringe, the fact that that was her favorite song opened up my eyes to her in a way I never grasped when she was still alive, and made me let go of any anger I had toward her. Suddenly she wasn’t just a bitter resentful old lady, she was completely humanized through that song. I understood that she struggled too, each and every day, and her judgement was just deflection.

I associate the Smog song “Teenage Spaceship” with my bus ride back home to attend my childhood best friend’s funeral, because it was a sad trip so of course I was listening to Smog, but that song in particular reminded me of growing up with her and how she saved me from myself. Once it came up on my iPod I just listened to it on repeat for the rest of the trip.

I associate the Grandaddy song “AM 180” with the first time I ever fell in love, and Bonnie Prince Billy’s “New Partner” with the first time I had my heart ripped out.

Tom Waits’ Real Gone, Arcade Fire’s Funeral and The Walkmen’s Bows + Arrows will forever be connected to my second year of university, when I moved out of the dorms and in with my friends, who were more aware of indie music than me at the time and who I am forever thankful to for exposing me to music outside the classic rock world I was so obsessed with back then.

I will always associate Elliott Smith’s “Miss Misery” with the year I was completely tortured in middle school, and how that song made me feel so much less alone.

Serge Gainsbourg will always remind me of one of the most fun dates I ever went on, in which I broke into Casa Loma in the middle of the night with one of the cutest guys I’d ever dated at that point in time.

Weakerthan’s “The Reasons” will always remind me of the first time I got to know someone who has become very special to me.

I made a whole mixtape of songs that I strongly associate with growing up, and my parents.

I could go on and on and on. Music is memories for me. Many good, some bad, all very important. And I think that’s the case for all of us who get obsessive about our records. It’s not “just music.” It’s our whole lives summed up in many different notes and words that the records have given us.

The songs are markers, audible tattoos that bring us back, let us live in that moment again, recall that person, place or time, for better or for worse. [Click to Tweet]

Messing with someone’s records is messing with their history, don’t do it without expecting some wrath.

Lisa

TGIF – Letterman, Nirvana and MDMA

cat-cafe-tokyo

Hey peeps! Happy weekend! Hope your week was lovely. The periods of sunshine have been glorious, even if they are almost always followed by rain. I’ll take 60+ degrees and rainy over 12 degrees and frozen. It’s finally beginning to feel normal in the city again.

I’m gearing up for another busy summer as festival season begins in a few weeks! Heads up, I’ll be doing giveaways for the first two festivals – Hot Docs and Canadian Music Week – so stay tuned.

Now, for the links:

  • Gotta throw in more videos of the ceremony because it was a truly inspired choice to have some of the best females in music taking Kurt’s place onstage for the performances – St. Vincent, Lorde, Kim Gordon, Joan Jett? You know he would have loved this:

Lisa

Today’s Quote – Musical Freedom

Kurt Cobain Punk is musical freedom. It's saying, doing and playing what you want. In Webster's terms, 'nirvana' means freedom from pain, suffering and the external world, and that's pretty close to my definition of Punk Rock.

Punk is musical freedom. It’s saying, doing and playing what you want. In Webster’s terms, ‘nirvana’ means freedom from pain, suffering and the external world, and that’s pretty close to my definition of Punk Rock.

Lisa